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Friday, October 24, 2014

Weekly Post: CHINA Travels Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Traveling in CHINA Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. Earthwatch was one organization that allowed foreigners to visit China without going through too much red-tape. These photographs are a first glimpse into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum. 




Friday, October 24, 2014

Traveling in China Since 1985, #102
CHINA #102:  Sometimes the stair construction quite intentionally offered some breathtaking exposure. Sometimes it was almost “Disney-like,” it would take such startling twists and turns. Among the gear we were wearing were our quality hiking boots. We had plenty of traction on the rocks and the rough-hewn stone of the ancient stairs, so on one long flight, I decided to try something to see if I could alleviate the pounding of my knees – I “ran” the entire staircase! By skipping from front edge of one step to the next front edge at speed, I pretty much never bent at the knee because my movement was too quick. At first Carey thought I had lost my mind, but the more I did it and assured her it was working, the better it looked to her as her knees were feeling it too.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China @Earthwatch_org

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Weekly Post: SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Friday, October 24, 2014

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #35
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #35 - 1985 to the Present:  This picture was made in 1986. I am standing at the confluence of the #Suzhou river flowing into the #Huangpu. Across the river is what will become the new financial district, #Pudong. The cranes you see are from the #Shanghai shipyard. They are NOT the sky cranes that will invade the city in coming years, but they ARE the tallest things around at the moment as all the rest are warehouses and farm houses. Next week's view of this same area will be from right about the middle of this picture, on that side of the river, and I will be looking down on Pudong 2002 from one of the tallest buildings in the world. Don’t miss it!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

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Thursday, October 23, 2014

Weekly Post: SUZHOU, 1985-to the present by RobertGlennKetchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.





Thursday, October 23, 2014

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #36
Suzhou #36:  A phrase often used in reference to old #Suzhou was the Chinese saying, “Above there is heaven and below there is #Hangzhou and Suzhou.” This was said because of their beauty. Hangzhou has #WestLake and the scenic surrounding mountains, Suzhou has the canals AND many, many elaborate gardens. Administrators and families of wealth would come to Suzhou for the hot months of summer.  They built numerous elegant private compounds, many of which have been historically preserved to this day. Inevitably my hosts at the #embroidery institute where I was working took me to see many of them. Others I sought-out while wandering. As it turned out, these visits actually informed and inspired some of the ideas later employed in our embroidery work.(See: My "Silk Road - Embroideries" blog for more about that work.)
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhuo

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Weekly Post: SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Thursday, October 23, 2014

Silk Road - Embroideries #92
SILK ROAD #92:  This detail shows the field of snow, suggesting the #illusion that it recedes into the distance behind the trunk of the tree. To accomplish this, layers of #stitches were built-up around the tree trunk where snow had "accumulated." Full #silk threads in various dye colors were used for these stitches.  Many times the stitches were sewn in reversed directions to refract light at different viewing angles.  BUT to make it appear as though the snowfield recedes, full silk threads were unwound into strands. The strands were dyed in ever-subtler tones, then the darker, 24th strands were sewn as the “middle” ground, and lightest 48th strands were the last to “disappear-in-the-distance.”
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Weekly Post: TATSHESHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!


Wednesday, October 22, 2014

TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild, #20
TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild, #20:  As we floated evermore into the coastal ranges, there were #glaciers everywhere. Many, as two in this picture, have been created by snow accumulation in cirques. However, these #summits are really ONLY THE FOOTHILLS of the central peaks in the two national parks, and the #glacier to the far right is NOT born from a cirque, but rather it is coming from a much larger snowfield ABOVE this #summit. We will have an AMAZING overview of this when we fly out, as from this position it seems hard to believe that most of this mountain and summits behind it under snowfields.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by RobertGlennKetchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.


Wednesday, October 22, 2014 


NO PEBBLE MINE #110, Pictures from Ground Zero:
NO PEBBLE MINE #110, Pictures from Ground Zero: To really see the heart of #LakeClarkNationalPark, we will leave #PortAlsworth and cross #LakeClark headed north. Looking back at Lake Clark, it appears there is weather in the pass... how unusual! Ahead of us, we are going to enter a terrain of rivers, lakes, big mountains, and broad mesas all marked in some way by signs of #volcanic activity. Your encounter with the #mountains is especially impressive in this park because the huge #AlaskaRange meets the #AleutianRange. Besides numerous #volcanoes being part of this landscape, Lake Clark (and the Alaska Peninsula) have one of the highest #earthquake frequencies in the world.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Weekly Post: TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act (#Wilderness), this new blog focuses on a wilderness area in the #Tongass rainforest of southeast Alaska. This is the tale of a 10-day kayak trip - a testament to WHY wilderness is important, by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Tuesday, October 21, 2014

TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #9
TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #9: I was amazed at the rate the tide was moving; you could quite literally cruise along without much paddling, and when you paddled it was like flying. Rock points and shallow bars ran out from various coves along the #shoreline and this particular extension served as a haul-out for seals until the inflowing tide submerged everything. Remember, this tide flux is a VERTICAL 18+-feet. That could cover hundreds of yards on a gently sloping beach. Our mission was to find a location that had freshwater nearby, AND did not go underwater at high tide.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wilderness #Wilderness #Tongass

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Monday, October 20, 2014

Weekly Post: THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


This is the story of my first major commission and book, THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS (Aperture, 1985). In 1984, #StephenShore, #WilliamClift and I received a 2-year commission from the Lila Acheson Wallace Fund to photograph the #HudsonRiverValley. This blog tells the tale of the book, with many photos not seen before. Enjoy!


Monday, October 20, 2014

THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS #107:
HUDSON RIVER #107: Once you get past #Albany and the influence of the tide, an #Arctic cold spell will freeze the river solidly from shore-to-shore. This particular cold snap was so sudden that here the river is frozen like clear glass. Note how clear the sky is as well - it is a classic, sub-zero sunrise from a brutally cold night with NO cloud cover, so all radiant heat was lost from the planet surface and now things are just shivering cold. We are all, as The Doors said, “Waiting for the sun….” During these winter shoots, I was wearing layers of #Patagonia gear, which was great when I was active, but when standing around waiting for "the" shot, my favorite item was a pair of road-workers bright orange, insulated, high-waisted pants with suspenders! It did indeed ward off the cold, BUT it also kept me from being struck by crazy drivers, or shot by drunken hunters.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wallacefdn @Aperturefnd @PentaxOnline
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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