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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Weekly Post: TATSHESHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!


Wednesday, October 22, 2014

TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild, #20
TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild, #20:  As we floated evermore into the coastal ranges, there were #glaciers everywhere. Many, as two in this picture, have been created by snow accumulation in cirques. However, these #summits are really ONLY THE FOOTHILLS of the central peaks in the two national parks, and the #glacier to the far right is NOT born from a cirque, but rather it is coming from a much larger snowfield ABOVE this #summit. We will have an AMAZING overview of this when we fly out, as from this position it seems hard to believe that most of this mountain and summits behind it under snowfields.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by RobertGlennKetchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.


Wednesday, October 22, 2014 


NO PEBBLE MINE #110, Pictures from Ground Zero:
NO PEBBLE MINE #110, Pictures from Ground Zero: To really see the heart of #LakeClarkNationalPark, we will leave #PortAlsworth and cross #LakeClark headed north. Looking back at Lake Clark, it appears there is weather in the pass... how unusual! Ahead of us, we are going to enter a terrain of rivers, lakes, big mountains, and broad mesas all marked in some way by signs of #volcanic activity. Your encounter with the #mountains is especially impressive in this park because the huge #AlaskaRange meets the #AleutianRange. Besides numerous #volcanoes being part of this landscape, Lake Clark (and the Alaska Peninsula) have one of the highest #earthquake frequencies in the world.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Weekly Post: TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act (#Wilderness), this new blog focuses on a wilderness area in the #Tongass rainforest of southeast Alaska. This is the tale of a 10-day kayak trip - a testament to WHY wilderness is important, by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Tuesday, October 21, 2014

TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #9
TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #9: I was amazed at the rate the tide was moving; you could quite literally cruise along without much paddling, and when you paddled it was like flying. Rock points and shallow bars ran out from various coves along the #shoreline and this particular extension served as a haul-out for seals until the inflowing tide submerged everything. Remember, this tide flux is a VERTICAL 18+-feet. That could cover hundreds of yards on a gently sloping beach. Our mission was to find a location that had freshwater nearby, AND did not go underwater at high tide.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wilderness #Wilderness #Tongass

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Monday, October 20, 2014

Weekly Post: THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


This is the story of my first major commission and book, THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS (Aperture, 1985). In 1984, #StephenShore, #WilliamClift and I received a 2-year commission from the Lila Acheson Wallace Fund to photograph the #HudsonRiverValley. This blog tells the tale of the book, with many photos not seen before. Enjoy!


Monday, October 20, 2014

THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS #107:
HUDSON RIVER #107: Once you get past #Albany and the influence of the tide, an #Arctic cold spell will freeze the river solidly from shore-to-shore. This particular cold snap was so sudden that here the river is frozen like clear glass. Note how clear the sky is as well - it is a classic, sub-zero sunrise from a brutally cold night with NO cloud cover, so all radiant heat was lost from the planet surface and now things are just shivering cold. We are all, as The Doors said, “Waiting for the sun….” During these winter shoots, I was wearing layers of #Patagonia gear, which was great when I was active, but when standing around waiting for "the" shot, my favorite item was a pair of road-workers bright orange, insulated, high-waisted pants with suspenders! It did indeed ward off the cold, BUT it also kept me from being struck by crazy drivers, or shot by drunken hunters.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wallacefdn @Aperturefnd @PentaxOnline
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Friday, October 17, 2014

Weekly Post: CHINA Travels Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Traveling in CHINA Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. Earthwatch was one organization that allowed foreigners to visit China without going through too much red-tape. These photographs are a first glimpse into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum. 




Friday, October 17, 2014

Traveling in China Since 1985, #101
CHINA #101:  Until now I have been showing you my surroundings and TALKING about the stairs, mostly because the morning was so dark on the path. What light we had was above, or in front of us... but the sun is up now, so here you go! The stairs have come out of the forest for a time, and although there are still some trees and blooming plants, this was a world of HUGE rocks, walls, and other strange, weather-worn stone shapes. We had seen very few people going either way on the stairs, but it was still relatively early in the day. In this photograph you can see some Chinese we had just passed still at the top of this “staircase”; this will give you some sense of the scale of the boulders.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China @Earthwatch_org

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Weekly Post: SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Friday, October 17, 2014

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #34
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #34 - 1985 to the Present:  For a brief period in the mid-'90's there seem to still be some integration of the old and new, even as neighborhoods were vanished or remodeled. But growing wealth, more and more cars, and the new super-highway systems really changed things. In developing #Pudong, the new financial district across the #Huangpu river, the highway system added two bridges and under-river tunnel to bring you into the Pudong district at very nearly the base of the #PearlTower. With that being a sort of a grand point of entrance to the district, an impressive boulevard was designed with the intention of building out dozens of architectural high-rise showcase buildings. To compliment the gateway of the Pearl Tower, it was decided to build the tallest building in the world a few blocks away, and to have it a signature CHINESE design, NOT one done by the many foreign architects working in Shanghai at the time.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

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Thursday, October 16, 2014

Weekly Post: SUZHOU, 1985-to the present by RobertGlennKetchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.





Thursday, October 16, 2014

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #35
Suzhou #35: This guy was pretty startled to find me wandering around as well. I took this shot on a bike ride and love the abstract, surreal nature of the setting. Looking carefully you can see family style in the clothing, night-pots airing while anchoring the bamboo poles.  And apparently this house commands a sizeable “courtyard”,  allowing them considerable space to air laundry next to the path. I had stopped to ponder all of this as the bicyclist appeared. He went by very quickly, but the look on his face was priceless! As if he could not imagine what he had just seen: a funny looking, long-haired, white person in a fuzzy jacket with a bunch of cameras, ON A BICYCLE, in the middle of his neighborhood, OMG!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhuo

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Weekly Post: SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Thursday, October 16, 2014

Silk Road - Embroideries #91
SILK ROAD #91:  In this detail you can see two other kinds of #stitching.  For the snow on the branch, some of detailing is the acupuncture needle stitch, and like the knotting stitches on the tree trunk, these #stitches have been sewn over others in some cases to create a #dimensional #texture. Note also the VERY subtle thread work at the bottom of this image. These are the last stitches in the matrix that define the receding field of snow behind the tree. Beyond these strands you see only the gauze of the #matrix and the white rag fabric offset beneath the matrix in the frame. Note especially the delicacy of these stitches... there is a reason they are so faint.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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