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Friday, March 6, 2015

Weekly Post: CHINA Travels Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Traveling in CHINA Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. Earthwatch was one organization that allowed foreigners to visit China without going through too much red-tape. These photographs are a first glimpse into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum. 


Friday, March 6, 2015

Traveling in China Since 1985, #121
CHINA #121:   A drive that now takes less than one hour (barring traffic) took more than three hours that day. It was VERY hot and the car had no air conditioning, so we stopped along the way to have some food and beer... the safest thing to be drinking besides really hot tea. This is the view of the surrounding countryside from the terrace of tour restaurant. The “garden” in the foreground is the entrance to the restaurant.  Look beyond HOWEVER: canals and ponds dominate the terrain.  The “roads” are extremely narrow, snaking over moon bridges and following the top of dikes between water bodies. We stopped here because this restaurant was known for “local” cuisine, which with all these ponds included fantastic shrimp and carp, as well as “special” greens, at that time unique to the #Suzhou area. Yummy!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China @Earthwatch_org

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Weekly Post: SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Friday, March 6, 2015


SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #54
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #54 - 1985 to the Present:  This is the view that will change the most. In this image, we are looking downriver from the #JinMaoTower, and #TheBund is off to the right, just out of view on the other side of the river. As you can see, even in 2002, much of this area, beyond the edges of the developed buildings along the expansive boulevard, was still VERY industrial. The new high-rise housing in the foreground foretells the future quite clearly, and any day now, any building you can see in this picture under 10-floors will be demolished. Before this blog is finished, three of the tallest buildings in the world will be in this general vacinity, all within walking distance of each other.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

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Thursday, March 5, 2015

Weekly Post: SUZHOU, 1985-to the present by RobertGlennKetchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Thursday, March 5, 2015

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #55
Suzhou #55:   I was very excited to have my work included in Aperture Foundation's (@ApertureFdn)  #exhibit. I agreed with the #curatorial choice of just concentrating on the work I had done around #Suzhou, because I did spend most of my time there and knew it with some intimacy. I loved the canals, boats, old community compounds, and pathways, and the sense they gave me of the historical past. I ALSO KNEW that they would eventually disappear so I thought having them included in the exhibit would be a welcome addition to the show. By the time the exhibit would arrive at #Chinese venues, much of Suzhou would be transformed, and there would be children that never knew it looked like this. Through these images I hoped they would “discover” the past and reflect on their “ancient” history dating back to Marco Polo, and well before.
ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou

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Weekly Post: SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, March 5, 2015


Silk Road - Embroideries #111
SILK ROAD #111:   Here, with very good lighting from both sides, you get the full effect of the “luminous” quality of this #embroidery. The dark trees and branches are brilliantly offset by the pale thread colors (depicting frost and steam), and the tiny #stitches used at the branch tips to radiate light. Zhang’s idea to contrast the flow of the water with the static shoreline and trees has been beautifully realized. And as much as I admire the work that the trees required, the riffles in the water truly have a sense of motion and I find that part of this embroidery the most interesting.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Weekly Post: TATSHESHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!


Wednesday, March 4, 2015

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #39
TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #39:   By dawn, the #Pacific had exerted its influence on the river, and the dazzling vistas of the day before disappeared. It wasn't raining, however, and the cloud cover seemed more like morning fog than bad weather. Later in the day we left the #TatshenshiniRiver corridor and floated into #AlsekLake, a large body of water fed by the river and many large glaciers that descend into it from #GlacierBayNationalPark (@glacierbaynps). Our next camp was on a broad western beach of the lake, looking west across the coastal plain towards the Pacific, and immediately adjacent the outlet where the #AlsekRiver (actually the Alsek and Tatshenshini combined) begins its run to the sea. The steep glacier-clad shorelines we were floating past were gone. Alsek Lake, HOWEVER, lies at the foot of some of the tallest summits in Glacier Bay, and many huge glaciers and icebergs would be visible, in, on, or across the lake, so we were all hoping the weather would clear.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

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Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by RobertGlennKetchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.



Wednesday, March 4, 2015 

NO PEBBLE MINE #129, Pictures from Ground Zero:
NO PEBBLE MINE #129, Pictures from Ground Zero:  Choosing a well protected place to camp is always essential in #Alaska. Here, this close to the heart of the range, and next to a large body of water, we knew it would get windy, and very cold when weather rolled through. The remainder of the day was spent securing camp for an incoming storm, and getting the boats “constructed.” By dinner the wind had picked up and the temp was headed downward... considerably!  By the time we finished eating it was blowing hard and starting to rain, so we retreated to our tents for the night. As I drifted comfortably off, the tent began to flap and bend as high wind gusts sweeped through the basin. The sound of wind, and eventually hard rain, continued all night. So much so, that when it stopped and grew quiet, it woke me up! As the first one out of his tent, this is how the morning greeted me.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Weekly Post: TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act (#Wilderness), this new blog focuses on a wilderness area in the #Tongass rainforest of southeast Alaska. This is the tale of a 10-day kayak trip - a testament to WHY wilderness is important, by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.





Tuesday, March 3, 2015


TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #28
TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #28:  Finally some breaks appeared in the clouds, and we entered the section of the #fjord that we thought hosted our intended camping beach. On the right hand side of the fjord, a large #valley with a sizable #river came through from ranges in #Canada. On the topo map it appeared the river created a rocky beach with some actual shoreline, and room to set up tents and a kitchen. One of our guide friends in #Juneau had warned, however, that we needed to stash our food bag(s) on the HIGHEST shoreline rock we could reach. This was because black bears followed the river down out of Canada, and sometimes they would show up and raid a camp that was left unprotected. I understood, BUT at the moment looking at these walls, all I could think of was, "rock climbing black bears... Really!?!"
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wilderness #Wilderness #Tongass

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Monday, March 2, 2015

Weekly Post: THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


This is the story of my first major commission and book, THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS (Aperture, 1985). In 1984, #StephenShore, #WilliamClift, and I received a 2-year commission from the Lila Acheson Wallace Fund to photograph the #HudsonRiverValley. This blog tells the tale of the book, with many photos not seen before. Enjoy!



Monday, March 2, 2015

THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS #126:
HUDSON RIVER #126:   Here is another dirt country road in the mid-Hudson valley also graced by the infamous #Hudson valley light. To be sure, this is a different season from the last post and it is A LOT colder on this particular evening, however the road was there, and as always, the elegance of the light was irresistible. It is worth noting that “winter” makes a country road seem more narrow. In the Hudson, many of the roads had VERY SOFT shoulders that went into swampy drainage ditches. You were never sure whether it was solid beneath the snowy edge. So often driving along I would pray not to meet anyone coming the other way, as on the narrowing road, one of us would have to pull to the side to let the other go by; not always with good results.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wallacefdn @Aperturefnd @PentaxOnline
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Tuesday, January 27, 2015

National Wilderness Conference

The other recent event celebrating the 50th Anniversary of The Wilderness Act I participated in was National Wilderness Conference in Albuquerque, NM. Organized by all of the collective federal agencies that manage wilderness lands, this was a multi-day event featuring numerous presentations and distinguished speakers such as Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, author Terry Tempest Williams, and Senator Tom Udall. I was asked to be an "inspirational" closing keynote speaker, along with my old friend, Dave Foreman, author of Ecodefense: A Field Guide to Monkeywrenching, and co-founder of Earth First!, the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance and  most recently, the Rewilding Institute

Dave Foreman, EcoWarrior, and Robert Glenn Ketchum, Conservation Photographer
Dave Foreman, Environmentalist, and Robert Glenn Ketchum, Conservation Photographer, 2014

Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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