Orvis ®

icon icon

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Weekly Post: SUZHOU, 1985-to the present by RobertGlennKetchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.






Thursday, December 18, 2014
Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #44
Suzhou #44:  In the mid-1980's things in #China changed quickly; and things disappeared quickly. If I knew then what I know now, I would have walked around EVERY minute of EVERY day and just shot thousands and thousands of #pictures! Even so, I did go out every day and shoot, just wandering around. At the time, I didn't see these images as a critique of quality-of-life; nor did I intend them to be anything other than documents of daily existence. Having previously traveled to rural #India, #Thailand, and the #Philippines, I didn't view these moments in China as being significantly different. This was a huge country with a stagnant economy, and people were simply trying to survive as best they could with what they had. At this moment in time, the #Chinese were not very industrialized, nor were they really part of the larger world economy. Those forces would begin to shift things rapidly from the world playing out here before my lens.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhuo

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post: SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, December 18, 2014

Silk Road - Embroideries #100
SILK ROAD #100:  First and foremost, please forgive the odd #color spectrum that looks like pink/blue circles in the water of this #photograph. They are called #NewtonRings, and they occur because the photograph is being made through the #plexiglass protecting the #embroidery and the #photographer who shot this did not #filter to neutralize the effect. It is distracting, HOWEVER you can still clearly see the "dimensional" space #illusion created by the detailed layers of the rock and the diaphanous, hand-painted blue matrix with minimal #stitches. The silver/white #threads are clearly bright enough to be convincing as a fog off-the-lake. The #embroiderer, Wu Xi, made excellent use of the 2-sided #transparency of this small screen, as well as using stitches in varying directions to create shimmer and change as the piece is viewed from different angles. I love the little weird stitches used to simulate tree-top reflections in the water!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
_________________________________________________

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Weekly Post: TATSHESHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!



Wednesday, December 17, 2014

TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild, #28
TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild, #28:  The day was truly sunny, warm, and beautiful, but a #glacial valley always has cool, #katabatic air flow down-valley that may not be strong, but it is constantly chilling, SO fashion of the day was the ever-attractive swimsuits/shorts-over-capilene-longjohns, capped off with your fleece vest and rain shell. Most of us were also sporting our knee-high rubber rain boots. Navigating on the #glacier was determined by steepness of terrain as no one had crampons or carried an ice ax, but the broad glacial tongue had few crevasses and was laced with dazzling rivers and pools of crystal clear, pale blue #water. With all the reflected sunlight, dark glasses were required, and looking through my viewfinder without them often caused my eyes to water. We probably could have all gotten nice tans if we weren't covered from head-to-toe!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post: NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by RobertGlennKetchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.



Wednesday, December 17, 2014 

NO PEBBLE MINE #118, Pictures from Ground Zero:
NO PEBBLE MINE #118, Pictures from Ground Zero:  The previous post shows the #headwater of the #Chilikadrotna #River from the air, and as I said, I did float the river, so here is the ‘Chili,’ from a river’s eye view, just shortly after leaving #TwinLakes. Those rolling hills have considerable height at the river’s edge, but as you can see, the #vegetation is spare ashore and easy to hike through. Significant to the visual drama of this image is the background hillside, notably #volcanic. Previous posts have pointed out that the distinct look of #LakeClark National Park is, in part, due to the dynamic volcanic #landscape, and the steep foothills of this background are the base of a #cinder mountain with virtually no vegetation and very striking scree flow patterns.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
_____________________________________________________

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Weekly Post: TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act (#Wilderness), this new blog focuses on a wilderness area in the #Tongass rainforest of southeast Alaska. This is the tale of a 10-day kayak trip - a testament to WHY wilderness is important, by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.





Tuesday, December 16, 2014

TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #17
TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #17:  Not unexpectedly, the familiar sound of #raindrops on the big blue camp tarp started about midnight and was pretty fierce for two or three hours. By breakfast, however, the gods were kind and the weather broke off. We got a good meal and loaded the boats without getting our gear soaked, then we were off for the day. The heavy #rainfall during the night, and the #weather system moving through, brought the steep walls of #TracyArm alive with flowing #water. With the summits playing peek-a-boo in the clouds, our paddle would start up the narrowing arm at a low tide, riding the incoming surge up-arm to what we hoped would be the next accessible camp. Paddling near the walls was especially interesting because the 18-foot #tide exposed #shellfish, #starfish, and marine growth clinging to the sheer #fiord shoreline WELL ABOVE US!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wilderness #Wilderness #Tongass

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
____________________________________________________

Monday, December 15, 2014

Weekly Post: THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


This is the story of my first major commission and book, THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS (Aperture, 1985). In 1984, #StephenShore, #WilliamClift and I received a 2-year commission from the Lila Acheson Wallace Fund to photograph the #HudsonRiverValley. This blog tells the tale of the book, with many photos not seen before. Enjoy!



Monday, December 15, 2014

THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS #115:
HUDSON RIVER #115:  OK! I promise. This is the last picture of “nothing.” Just another wiggly day in front of my ground glass. For me, this image is about color tone similarities, BUT it also echoes a quote from the American painter #AndrewWyeth that I have always appreciated and agreed with: “I prefer winter and fall, when you feel the bone structure of the landscape. Something waits beneath it; the whole story does not show.”
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wallacefdn @Aperturefnd @PentaxOnline
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
____________________________________________________

Friday, December 12, 2014

Weekly Post: CHINA Travels Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Traveling in CHINA Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. Earthwatch was one organization that allowed foreigners to visit China without going through too much red-tape. These photographs are a first glimpse into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum. 




Friday, December 12, 2014

Traveling in China Since 1985, #109
CHINA #109:  We left the amusement of the steep #staircase to continue our path to #YuPingLu. We finally crested the #ridge where we imagined the guest house to be -- and as I feared -- we were still some distance (and many more UP stairs) away. Yu Ping Lu was not in view BUT THIS WAS!  The scale here makes the path hard to see, so look carefully at your screen and follow me: Carey and I are looking down a short flight of stairs that will take us into the trees in the lower right of this picture. Rising from those trees you can see the stairs emerging and beginning to climb up into a very steep slot between rock walls. As the stairs rise (about the middle of this image), just below the dark rock face, they connect to an extremely narrow #bridge above a #chasm. After that, the stairs climb straight up the #gorge. The small dots of color you might see are people, actually quite a lot of them. Most of them are coming towards us having left Yu Ping Lu to continue their ascent of Mt. #Huangshan. Yu Ping Lu was hopefully over this next ridge, we were growing weary of the "up-to-go-down" complexity of the path and also worried that we were behind schedule on our descent.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China @Earthwatch_org

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
____________________________________________________

Weekly Post: SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Friday, December 12, 2014

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #42
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #42 - 1985 to the Present:  At 1,535-feet high, the #PearlTower was the tallest structure in #China from when it was completed in 1994 until 2007. The scale of the tower is striking: note the large ceremonial group of people dwarfed by the #structure. The entire tower is supported by three massive columns that connect 11 #spheres. The huge internal space of the spheres house 15 observatory levels, exhibition facilities, restaurants, a shopping mall, and a 20-room hotel. The upper observation platform (not visible here) has an outside glass floor, and one of the largest spheres features a revolving restaurant. When first constructed, the tower stood alone, but over the ensuing years, many other very stylized buildings have come into the neighborhood, which also now features an amazing pedestrian #bridge complex you will see in later posts. After my many years of visiting #Shanghai, watching the colorfully illuminated tower disappear and reappear in passing clouds and fog like some huge alien craft is one of my favorite embedded memories.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
____________________________________________________

Thursday, November 13, 2014

1968 Self Portraits of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Self-portrait in 4-F Camouflage, 1968
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
These images were created as part of a class assignment while studying with Robert Heinecken (#RobertHeinecken) at #UCLA in 1968. These are black and white (b/w) photographs that have been highly manipulated in the darkroom, and then painted upon with oils of different transparency value. Heinecken was a very non-traditional photographer who encouraged experimental work.  He furthered my approach and thinking about the process of making pictures begun in my first #photography classes at UCLA, taught by Edmund Teske (#EdmundTeske), also a very non-traditional photographer. I know my work was also influenced by contemporary graphics as well as many of the rock star personalities I was photographing at the time.

self-portrait, tribute to #JimiHendrix, 1968
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2014, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
I studied/mentored with Edmund Teske, Robert Heinecken, AND Eliot Porter, so this would be my version of environmental portraiture. No wonder I was never very popular among art directors doing annual reports!

~Robert Glenn Ketchum

Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

icon icon