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Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Weekly Post: TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act (#Wilderness), this new blog focuses on a wilderness area in the #Tongass rainforest of southeast Alaska. This is the tale of a 10-day kayak trip - a testament to WHY wilderness is important, by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.





Tuesday, July 7, 2015

TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #46
TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #46:  This is the reverse position from the last post. I find it amazing how there are clearly considerable dimensions to this beach/river complex that is now our camp, and from offshore at a distance it simply does not read like this AT ALL! Russell and Carey are prepping food and snacking to stay warm while I “document.” The blue tarp is the kitchen and the high tide will reach into it later tonight. Russell ‘s tent is the light brown one on the right side and it is in the safest, driest perch. Carey and I are in the blue tent that was quite comfy because we cleared a few rocks and were on a sand bottom. We also had a GREAT view, BUT we were on a mound in the middle of the spread of the river. We were rather hoping it did not rain any harder and bring the river up. Good luck with that idea!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wilderness #Wilderness #Tongass

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Monday, July 6, 2015

Weekly Post: THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


This is the story of my first major commission and book, THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS (Aperture, 1985). In 1984, #StephenShore, #WilliamClift, and I received a 2-year commission from the Lila Acheson Wallace Fund to photograph the #HudsonRiverValley. This blog tells the tale of the book, with many photos not seen before. Enjoy!



Monday, July 6, 2015

THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE HIGHLANDS #144:
HUDSON RIVER #144:   #Harriman State Park, in particular, is a spectacle of Eastern, deciduous woodlands. Challenging topography, swamps, bogs, lakes everywhere, and dense forests make Harriman a wonderful place to wander, but as with the not-too-well marked dirt roads, one can easily get lost walking. Even in the winter when most of the trees are leafless, line-of-sight in any direction may only be a few hundred feet. When the trees leaf-out even the sky disappears. As a photographer, I loved this environment but it gave me a whole new respect for navigation with a compass. I suppose if I were on this #HudsonRiver commission today, I would be using the GPS on my #iPhone6+. Hell, I would be using the iPhone6+camera as well! Toss the medium format, the tripod, and those rolls of film that often had to be changed in the pouring rain.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wallacefdn @Aperturefnd @PentaxOnline
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Friday, July 3, 2015

Weekly Post: CHINA Travels Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Traveling in CHINA Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. Earthwatch was one organization that allowed foreigners to visit China without going through too much red-tape. These photographs are a first glimpse into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum. 


Friday, July 3, 2015

Traveling in China Since 1985, #138
CHINA #138:   In 1986, #LakeTaihu was a rural, and rather idyllic, quiet countryside. Surrounded by a few small villages, the shores were mostly agricultural fields, busy with farmers going about their daily chores. The lake had hundreds of small fish farms whose owners often lived nearby onshore, or quite literally, in boats tied up next to the fish pens. When boat traffic did ply the water, is was usually craft such as you see here, low profile and probably running on a sputtering single stroke engine. Many boats did not even have that and they were simply paddled or sailed. This is NOT #LakeHavasu at #EasterBreak. Well,..at least not yet!

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou


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Weekly Post: SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Friday, July 3, 2015


SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #71
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #71 - 1985 to the Present:  In my last post I made reference to walking around the “new” #Shanghai as being like being on another planet. So, put yourself in my shoes: I am alone, I speak virtually no Chinese, I cannot read Chinese, and then I come upon this! Where am I, and what is going on here? Suddenly I realized the rising #Pudong district was NOT a new financial zone. In actuality it was a spaceport being secretly constructed to LOOK like a business district. At this moment I have stumbled into the flying saucer construction area, and it is now perfectly clear to me that the #JinMaoTower is an alien rocket ship. Holy cow, that is where I am staying! Well, I guess that would better explain the bar at night..
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

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Thursday, July 2, 2015

TELL THE PEBBLE PARTNERSHIP TO CALL IT QUITS

The fight to stop the Pebble Mine goes on -- but the battlefront has moved from the U.S. EPA to the courtroom and beyond as we escalate massive nationwide pressure on Northern Dynasty Minerals, the last company standing behind the disastrous venture, to call it quits.

Over the last two weeks, NRDC ran a series of hard-hitting, full-page print ads in Washington urging the Pebble Partnership -- Northern Dynasty's legal entity -- to walk away from Pebble Mine. The EPA has confirmed that this gargantuan open-pit, gold and copper operation -- along with its estimated 10 billion tons of toxic mining waste -- carries catastrophic risk for Bristol Bay, its world-class salmon fishery, its pristine environment and its people.

Weekly Post: SUZHOU, 1985-to the present by RobertGlennKetchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Thursday, July 2, 2015

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #72
Suzhou #72:   So, the exhibit, “CHINA: Fifty Years Inside The People’s Republic” closed in Hong Kong, the edits were made, and then the somewhat smaller exhibit shipped to the recently opened #Shanghai Museum for its big premier “inside” mainland China. I was excited because I was planning to attend the opening and was eager to invite Zhang Meifang to see another side of my photography (in a museum setting) “honoring” the very city in which she lived and worked – images I had made during the time I was collaborating with her. Michael Hoffman, CEO of #ApertureFoundation and organizer of the exhibit and publication notified all of the edited artists as to what had been removed, so I was surprised when he called me. Michael was also quite surprised because he had to inform me that EVERY SINGLE PICTURE OF MINE HAD BEEN EDITED OUT OF THE SHOW. I was stunned and asked why that would happen. His reply was a phrase I had heard before in reference to another edited artist’s work, “these pictures are of an unhappy time which no one wishes to remember.” WOW! Talk about controlling the minds of the next generation…
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou

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Weekly Post: SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum


Thursday, July 2, 2015
Silk Road - Embroideries #128
SILK ROAD #128:   Traditional Chinese embroidery often included themes/subjects that were regularly repeated because they were showcases for tour-de-force embroidery stitching. Some subjects, such as dogs and cats, were way overdone, and in reality most of those were “training” exercises created by younger embroiderers still working on their skills. Other subjects were rendered by master embroiderers to define how “good” THEIR guild work was. The peacock was one of those subjects. It was said that a peacock feather embroidered onto the robe of a high administrator was so realistic that the embroidery could not be distinguished from an actual feather. One of the best of these peacocks was on display in the special "museum" room at the institute, and was SO striking that we included it in the “Threads of Light” exhibit at the #UCLA-FolwerMuseum. The red/black floral background is not too shabby, either!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Weekly Post: TATSHESHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!


Wednesday, July 1, 2015

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #56
TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #56:  The pilots intended to go up-and-over the coastal range to reach the #Tatshenshini corridor. So, as we gained elevation, I got one last remarkable look at the #AlsekRiver as it wound its way across the #YakutatForelands to the #Pacific. This image demonstrates the danger of floating a river of this size. If you recall, earlier in this blog (posts #14-16), I told the story of the catastrophic morning “mistake” that threw #CeliaHunter into the Tat, and nearly drowned one of our guides. That incident came about because our “cargo” raft was almost pulled down the “wrong” braid in the river by the strong current. At river level, it's often difficult to tell which is the “right” braid.  The wrong one may ground, or trap, a boat. Look at the meandering confusion in the upper-third of this image (which we floated through). Even from this “eagle’s view” it's difficult to recognize the “right” braid. THIS is where the experience of a river guide is essential. Thank you to our excellent guide, Dick Rice, for keeping it a GREAT trip for all!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

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Orvis Supports No Pebble Mine

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